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  • Visual Index of Ruby Scripts - Discussions

    There are so many Ruby scripts out there but there isn't one definitive index of them for VISUAL people.

    Objective: Something one can scroll down and SEE what's made possible by Ruby Scripts, preferably without reading texts.

    I set up an indipendant thread for this indexing - Visual Index of Ruby Scripts

    In them, a Ruby Script will be visually explained in one to few posts, depending on how complex its usage is.
    There is a Index at the begining of the thread, hyperlinked to individual posts.
    They will be revised and augmented as the thread grows.

    I'll just throw the dice and see what becomes of this.
    All discussions regarding this Ruby Index should take place here in this thread, rather than in the Index thread.

    Please use the format below to post in the thread.
    You don't have to fill them up, just leave some blank if you don't know what to write.

    Name of the script:
    Author: - if known
    Free or commercial: -
    Description: - what it does and how it works
    Menu: - How to implement the ruby (Tools, Plugins, Context menu, etc)
    Conflicts or Bugs: - if any known
    Link to script: - host or location
    Similar Rubies: - if any known
    Related links: - tutorials, docs, threads, discussions
    Tips: -
    Last edited by takesh h; 29-06-2009, 10:31.

  • #2
    How to install and use Ruby Scripts

    Google detailed how to install and use Ruby Scripts in the following URL.
    http://sketchup.google.com/intl/en/d...byscripts.html

    Excerpts:
    Installing Ruby Scripts

    To install a Ruby Script, here's what you need to do:

    1. Download it onto your computer.
    2. If the downloaded file is zipped, unzip it. You can usually do this by double-clicking on it. Unzipped Ruby Script files have the following file extension: .rb
    3. Close SketchUp if it's running.
    4. Copy the Ruby Script file into the right location for your operating system:
    Windows: C:/Program Files/Google/Google SketchUp 7/Plugins
    Mac OS X: 'Hard Drive'/Library/Application Support/Google SketchUp 7/SketchUp/Plugins

    Using Ruby Scripts

    The location of the controls for the Ruby Script you just installed depends on the Script; you access some through the menu system, and others by means of right-clicking on elements of your model. Some Ruby Scripts have their own dialog boxes, while others don't appear in the SketchUp user interface at all - they're just "reference" scripts that provide functionality for other scripts. How you use each script should be explained by its author, probably in the location from which you downloaded the script.


    Ruby scripts are (unless scrambled by the authors) plain text files, you should be able to open them with any text editors.
    Most of them explain how they should be used at the begining of files.
    In "Visual Index", [Menu] refers to the method which you can implement the particular script.
    Since I started adding [Menu] entries only recently, you have to find them by opening scripts with text editors for most of the time.
    Last edited by takesh h; 29-06-2009, 10:34.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just a remark : if it's a visual index why have
      "Description: - what it does and how it works" ?
      seems an image is sufficient like this one for the Follow me & rotate

      Comment


      • #4
        Good on you mate this is what I was thinking the other day! I have actually a bucket of ruby's in a folder though NONE installed, I had a stack installed in previous SU versions but most of the time have something modelled as quickly as I can work out the one to suit my need!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Frenchy Pilou View Post
          Just a remark : if it's a visual index why have
          "Description: - what it does and how it works" ?
          seems an image is sufficient like this one for the Follow me & rotate
          Well if images suffice, then you don't need text, you are right.
          Thank you for posting anyway, Frenchy.

          Comment


          • #6
            should we post plugins, like exporters?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Boner View Post
              should we post plugins, like exporters?
              Are you talking about uploading plugin files to PPB? If it's a free plugin, I guess you can.
              Or are you saying if we should include exporters as a subject matter?
              I'm undecided about that... since it's kind of self-explanatory that what certain exporters do, they don't need to be visually explained.
              Last edited by takesh h; 11-10-2008, 08:06.

              Comment


              • #8
                Great idea takesh!, that will make them SO much easier to understand and utilize.

                Awesome.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by takesh h View Post
                  Are you talking about uploading plugin files to PPB? If it's a free plugin, I guess you can.
                  Or are you saying if we should include exporters as a subject matter?
                  I'm undecided about that... since it's kind of self-explanatory that what certain exporters do, they don't need to be visually explained.
                  Yes, I tought aobut includeing exporters as a subject matter... Eksporters for Artlantis, kerkythea etc. for example... It's a free stuff, but we can save some time searching for them... All in one place.

                  And yes, they can't be visually explained...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This thread is another of those essential del.icious bookmarks. Keep up the good work.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by takesh h View Post
                      Conflicts or Bugs: it's all manual!
                      ALL MANUAL?!?

                      crazy. I think there is another script on smustard that automates it.
                      It wasn't free though.

                      Or just use "pepakura".
                      Last edited by takesh h; 14-10-2008, 22:18.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        great stuff... thank you all!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Takesh_h, firstly great source and much appreciation for yours and others efforts...
                          I notice the PipeAlongPath ruby was added which prompted this post:

                          which do you guys prefer? PipeAlongPath / TubeAlongPath / ExtrudeAlongPath.....?

                          They all seems to provide the same outcome......

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by utiler View Post
                            which do you guys prefer? PipeAlongPath / TubeAlongPath / ExtrudeAlongPath.....?

                            They all seems to provide the same outcome......
                            Ruby Scripts are sometimes redundant, coders reinvent wheels often times.
                            But those three rubies are written by the same guy, TIG, so they cannot be redundant. I'll just copy + paste the descriptions by TIG.

                            Name : ExtrudeAlongPath
                            # Description : Creates rectangular faced 'followme' extrusions along a path -
                            # Use it to make walls, fascias, soffits, frames, rails etc,
                            # starting from a selection of joined edges

                            Name : TubeAlongPath
                            # Description : Creates circular faced 'followme' tube extrusions along a path -
                            # Use it to make pipes, ducts, rails etc,
                            # starting from a selection of joined edges

                            When you want to know what a certain ruby is about, open that ruby (.rb file) in a text editor. Usually the first part of a ruby is the description of itself.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by roadkill View Post
                              great stuff... thank you all!
                              takesh h is the man! It's his idea.

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