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  • Originally posted by gorgon View Post
    image 4 of this post #717 is my money shot, could be downtown Kyoto! and it made me realise that I don't like the shiny corrugated tin. Could you paint that to make it a bit more wabi-sabi dull?
    I love that shot too Kieran ([MENTION=6716]gorgon[/MENTION]). Gotta get a tripod 'though!
    That shiny tin is actually stainless steel that just needs a wash. I couldn't paint it without loosing a huge amount of reflected light for this the south facade.

    East and west facades I could consider painting it wasabi.... hmm?, but up close people have liked the mottled and dinted zincalume.
    Last edited by simon seasons; 02-11-2011, 02:36.

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    • Didn't want to bore you with details so here's the other hearth all done. I put a very tough wood trim (can't remember name of wood just now) around the edge to get a deeper pour to seal it all up. I found two dried rat carcasses under the old hearth as I broke it up. Glad that spirits gone.

      Best thing was the find behind the cement sheet where the gas heater used to be. !!!

      A large piece of old fire distorted boiler plate with riveting holes in it. I quickly hung it up tonight on some old clothes line cable I'd kept for just this occasion. It makes a very distinctive and long lasting bell.

      After hanging it on the post and banging it once, I went inside to get my camera and when I came out I noticed thin real skinny thirsty bloke with a shopping bag on the verandah.

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      Last edited by simon seasons; 10-11-2011, 21:14.

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      • I plastered all the fireplace brickwork with three coats of base coat plaster. Previous owner had sandblasted it to buggery so the plaster stuck on very well. I've also closed it off and it'll take some piece of furniture, or flowers.
        Also rebuilt the window which had had a large hole cut through the sill and bottom rail of the window sash to fit an airconditioner. Luckily found a matching white cedar at my trusty salvage yard with a piece big enough to carve a new sill insert.
        Just have to wash down and paint now.


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        • The walls need one more coat and the window but it certainly looks better.



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          • Just an update image.
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            • Ploughing through the painting and have a couple of ceiling 'roses' to show you.
              These are around 90 years old and have a strongish art deco feel about them but a stronger trace of conservative ideals as well. The hallway one with the pendant light has what's called a hawks tail design and in it is included a pattern based on the crinkly part of a hawks leg and talon as well. But overall the design still has the military regalia look that would have been more popular in the 1800's and up to the first world war which was going on just before this house was built.

              The second bedroom one (with part of fan blade in it) has a much more 'arts and craft' feel about it but still reliant on geometrics rather than the free flowing forms of later periods.
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              • Almost done all the under-battens for fixing the gal sheet lining to the underside of the verandah roof.
                You'll be able to see it clearly contrasting with the rafters, when the lining is up, but I have bent the lower end of the timber battens up 40mm so that the lining will have a sweep upwards at the lower end of the rafters, mimicking a Japanese/Chinese style eave sweep. Should look very subtly different to every Aussies dream cool temperature verandah, but until one looks carefully you shouldn't be able to notice exactly why the verandah looks so bloody good and why it compliments the Japanese doors at the other end of the house.

                Budget restrictions have forced a change of design in the shed eave and garden, which I'll elucidate further later on but for now I'll say it's a really good change that pars down to purity what was initially too fussy anyway. The side of the shed will be louvres matching those on the house and the eave will be open purlins. In the garden the raised gabion walled bed is instead going to be a simple deep gravel bed with five shinto inspired boulders. The gravel bed will be a water sink stone mulch to cool the back of the house further and eliminate totally any grass from the house. It unifies the whole initial tsuboniwa concept with a stone Zen garden, and just as well 'cause we've run out of money and it's a hell of a lot less work and probably far more beautiful. I love serendipity.
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                Last edited by simon seasons; 08-12-2011, 02:31.

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                • Your bending the lining up 40mm? Thats ridiculously fuzzy. That edge isn't even expressed as the lining terminates at the big heavy beam....

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                  • Originally posted by AgentVlin View Post
                    Your bending the lining up 40mm? Thats ridiculously fuzzy. That edge isn't even expressed as the lining terminates at the big heavy beam....
                    Not sure what you mean Tim. It'll be sheet metal (repurposed galvanised tank cladding) beaded all round with a trimmend off bullnose edge of a weather board. You'll see the sweep up as a thickening of the rafter. The verandah beam is deeper than the rafters and so it forms a negative end to the sweep. The suggestion of expression will be that the sweep continues over the beam.

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                    • Originally posted by simon seasons View Post
                      You'll see the sweep up as a thickening of the rafter ... The suggestion of expression will be that the sweep continues over the beam.
                      I don't think it will look like the sweep will/could/should continue over the beam. It will just look like someone fat has sat on the roof and squashed it down. Or that the lining is sagging
                      This fussy tweak (and other strange quirks you produce) risk making your verandah look uncooperative, strange or even belligerent.

                      I won't accuse you of willfulness, because I know your not. But fussy could be confused for willfulness if not executed properly.
                      Last edited by AgentVlin; 08-12-2011, 06:43.

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                      • Sorry, not 40mm, actually 30mm.

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                        • Originally posted by AgentVlin View Post
                          This fussy tweak (and other strange quirks you produce) risk making your verandah look uncooperative, strange or even belligerent.
                          fussy could be confused for willfulness if not executed properly.
                          I had a design problem and I overcame it with this detail. It works in well with the rest of the design going on all around it, which is often strange I know but not yet uncooperative of belligerent.

                          What is this willfulness I could be accused of? You're not tired are you?

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                          • Originally posted by simon seasons View Post
                            I had a design problem and I overcame it with this detail.
                            What was the problem? What was the reason for the sweep?

                            Not tired, just trying to 'start a fire'. You know how it goes.
                            Last edited by AgentVlin; 08-12-2011, 11:36.

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                            • Originally posted by AgentVlin View Post
                              What was the problem? What was the reason for the sweep?

                              Not tired, just trying to 'start a fire'. You know how it goes.
                              The roof battens are what I have to fix to and the last edge batten had to be on top of the beam. To get the under battens in as an even line I would have had to block out the rafters behind the beam to create a fixing point. I realised if I made the under-battens 30mm pine I could bend them up and go into the side of the last edge batten instead and then block out only the the under-battens (as seen in notated image) to provide stronger fixing points for the sheet metal. This avoids making too many connections in timber and nails between loads which is important in carpentry from a structural point of view (short blocks splitting from to many nails and the whole edge risks dropping out) and expense/time position, and it creates a really nice sweep up with the full depth of the rafters visible, that I am going to enjoy more.

                              PS, Sorry I didn't get back sooner. After your last post I had 8 hours of some horrible Thai gastro bug my daughter brought back from her holidays. I won't go into details other than simply horrible and exhausting.
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                              Last edited by simon seasons; 09-12-2011, 00:50.

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                              • Small job getting the walkway deck ready is the edge step at the end. It's a piece of salvaged redgum garden edging that I have planed and chiseled into shape. The bottom surface is cleaned up back to new wood so that it won't rot on the underside of the step. The deep rebate has a channel in the back of it because the decking timber goes on the high edge and drains into the channel as i'll leave a gap between decking timber and top step. Once fixed in place I drilled a heap of holes in it to drain and dry the wood out under the decking edge. The extra hole in front of the coach bolts was a mistake but it'll help to dry out the connection between step and bearers anyway. Un-photographed is the deep check taken out of the end of the bearers to bring the high edge of the rebate level with the bearer tops.


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                                Last edited by simon seasons; 12-12-2011, 00:25.

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