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  • Daniel Libeskind's "Micromegas" Drawings (1979)

    Thought PPB members would enjoy these high-res images of Daniel Libeskind's "Micromegas" series from 1979.

    Though the name Daniel Libeskind has become synonymous with large-scale public commissions, it wasn't always so. Before the Jewish Museum was built in Berlin, Libeskind was known only as an academic architect without a built design to his name. So it seems fitting that his birthplace as a world-renowned architect would be hosting Kontrapunkt, a comprehensive collection of his works. The exhibition presented models, sketches, photographs and films of 14 projects, including his competition winning proposal for Ground Zero and the World Trade Centre, however it was the "fringe" works that caught my eye.

    It is interesting to contemplate what Potsdamer Platz, Berlin's impressive focal point or unfortunate eyesore, depending on your point of view, would have become under Libeskind's direction. His design, called "Out of Line", incorporated significant open spaces between 10 "puzzle" pieces derived from the fragments of memories buried in Potsdamer Platz, referred to as "the thunderbolts of absolute absence".

    Early in his career Libeskind produced two suites of drawings which reflected his thinking about the nature of architectural space: Micromegas and Chamberworks. Developed from his interest in geometry, Micromegas could be considered an alternative blueprint, whilst Chamberworks seems to explore the interaction between architecture and music, deeply rooted in his background and arguably one of his greatest influences. Both are clearly the basis on which Libeskind's theatrical, geometrically complex architecture was developed and it is remarkable how his vision, borne in these drawings, have been realised in his projects.
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  • #2
    Part II

    Part II
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    • #3
      Part III

      Part III
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      • #4
        Part IV

        Part IV
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        • #5
          wow they are awesome and inspiring. I never knew they existed. Where did you find them? Could you post a link?

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          • #6
            Nice.

            Incidentally, is Abnormalia east or west of Discordia, or is it closer to Annexia?

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            • #7
              I fell in love with these drawings a long time ago and still look at them occasionally. I find them to be in contrast/similarity with the work of Lebbeus Woods, as one choses linear expression (mechanical construct) over the curvilinear (free-form hand).

              These drawings can be found in the book Daniel Libeskind Countersign 1991/1992. One of my favorite books because of another Libeskind project: Three Lessons in Architecture, 1985. During my academic studies 1988-1993, this book was perhaps the single most influential material that shaped my direction in Architecture. I highly recommend the book if you can find one on a shelf.

              On a side note - since this book and most recently, the work of Daniel Libeskind is no longer of any personal influence or inspiration.
              Last edited by InArch; 11-03-2010, 17:05.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by InArch View Post
                During my academic studies 1988-1993, this book was perhaps the single most influential material that shaped my direction in Architecture.

                On a side note - since this book and most recently, the work of Daniel Libeskind is no longer of any personal influence or inspiration.
                What happened? A big fall for love child from the single most important influence to of no personal influence / inspiration

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gorgon View Post
                  What happened? A big fall for love child from the single most important influence to of no personal influence / inspiration
                  I can sort of empathise with inarch on that, I find Libeskinds early work, his investigations for the jewish museum, these drawings etc all to be very interesting and quite inspiring. However like Inarch I find that most of his recent work leaves me a bit cold.

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                  • #10
                    really nice drawings. i wonder if he draw them or some hungry student "dogs". in 1998 i went to berlin and to the jewish museum, it wasn't completed yet so i took photos only from the outside. i remember that while i was walking outside the building i imagine how it could be in the inside. i have never went again back to visit the museum. has somebody visit the museum?

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                    • #11
                      That is "Pollock" geometrical drawing
                      Last edited by Frenchy Pilou; 17-03-2010, 20:06.

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                      • #12
                        very freaky

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                        • #13
                          Missed this the first time around. Thanks for the bump.

                          Interesting that some don't find his architecture quite so pleasing, including myself. Not every vision or idea can be translated into a (good) building let alone good architecture. Some things should just stay on paper.

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                          • #14
                            Wow..something new..well, for me its not that nice too look at though..

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by angelos View Post
                              really nice drawings. i wonder if he draw them or some hungry student "dogs". in 1998 i went to berlin and to the jewish museum, it wasn't completed yet so i took photos only from the outside. i remember that while i was walking outside the building i imagine how it could be in the inside. i have never went again back to visit the museum. has somebody visit the museum?
                              I did, this summer; it was utterly amazing!
                              The exhibition itself wasn't even remotely interesting (forgive me, dear pushpullbar jews), it actually made me wish it didn't exist in order to see the building properly. On the other hand, the architectural spaces with no exhibits (the Garden of Exile, the Void, the Holocaust Tower) were really powerful.

                              I think I'd prefer it if there were no exhibits at all, just empty spaces; the feeling caused by the building was more than enough.

                              First post here, yay! It's been quite a while I've been stalking your forum but not daring to write.

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